Jerky is better than Cookies

The holidays are coming and the kitchen smells like garlic and fennel. It is time to make jerky.

What’s the main ingredient? Beef, of course.  I am typically a fan of lots of nice, flavorful fat in meat, but fatty jerky means a mess in the dehydrator and oily face and fingers later. I used ground beef for this batch. It’s quick to mix and using an extruder means I can make uniform tubes of meat that dry evenly.

I’d be uncomfortable serving ground meat that is not ground locally and raised on pasture. I like single-animal foods, not a mixture of thousands of animals I’ve never met. Jerky in a dehydrator barely reaches high enough internal temperature to be considered cooked and may do so very slowly. It seems only prudent to begin with the safest product possible.

I had a few select roasts cut from a hindquarter, but most of the hindquarter was ground. I think the forequarter is most tender and the hindquarter is more flavorful. Gristle – nasty connective tissue does not become edible through grinding. Be picky! When in doubt put trimmings in the dog pile. I am a fan of fat for flavor, but for jerky ground meat with no added fat avoids a mess in the dehydrator.

meat and spices being blendedRaw beef

Preservatives can be a scary idea, nitrates and nitrites sound dangerous. I used to avoid them. Many preserved meat products that lack added nitrites contain celery seed, which contains naturally occurring nitrites. So, I only know enough to tell you that you need to decide for yourself, and my choice of celery seed is about convenience and flavor. The time that the meat is most vulnerable to bacterial growth is while the seasonings are being mixed in, the jerky is being extruded and before the temperature rises. Work cold and work quickly. Clean surfaces, clean tools, gloves are a nice touch. If your dehydrator is slow to warm you can make jerky in a low oven.

Better than Chocolate Beef Jerky

2 pounds lean ground Milking Devon beef
1 Tablespoon Black Pepper
1 Tablespoon Fennel Seed
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1 Tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Sea Salt finely ground
1 teaspoon Celery seed
1 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon Garlic Powder
1 teaspoon Thyme

Grind spices together until finely powdered. An electric coffee grinder is ideal.

2 Tablespoons Low-Sodium Soy Sauce
2 Tablespoons Worchestershire Sauce
2 teaspoons Liquid Smoke

Mix all ingredients, an electric mixer with a paddle works well.

Using a jerky press or extruder pipe spirals of meat onto dehydrator shelves covered with parchment paper or silicone sheets.

Dry at 145 to 165oF for 8 to 12 hours or until dark and rubbery, turning once after 2 hours.

Refrigerated storage is recommended.

Can a cow be an ox? Can an ox be a cow?

What is an ox? Everyone seems to agree that it is a mature bovine trained to pull loads. There is some disagreement in the English speaking world about whether oxen must be male. Whether the word means only male or any working bovine shouldn’t be the point.

My friends in Spain work bulls more often than steers.

According to Paul Starkey of AnimalTraction.org, globally there are more female working animals than male.

Most of the draft animal using world doesn’t speak English anyway.

To avoid controversy I have made up a new term. I like Ux taurus – the bull’s wife.

If Latin isn’t your thing, the term handy cow is a good description.

 

Cows are multi-use. The same cow that I milk can be used for draft work. A German study has shown that 4 hours or less of work per day does not have a significant effect on milk production. Cows should have some rest time before and after calving. I have very little time to work train animals. I could not justify keeping animals that didn’t produce in a way beyond their work.

For me the biggest drawback to training heifers is about the time a team is about to be useful i end up selling one or both for breeding.

HineSite – I should have done this years ago.

Milking Devon cow Lark and Kendy Sawyer in stall at Western NC Agricultural Center. Mother Earth News Fair 2015

The farm is called HineSite partly as a wordplay on husband Bob’s last name and as an acknowledgment that I learn primarily from making mistakes. I have learned a lot in the last few years, fortunately not all through personal experience.